Comfortable home heating

What is Hybrid Heating?

Home heating is one of the most talked about topics when it comes to energy savings and use.  If you live in an area where you experience and suffer from the harsh realities of winter every year, you have no choice but to use up as much energy and fuel as possible in order to produce heat. And while there is an abundance of heating oil, natural gas, electricity, and propane in this part of the world, you can never deny the fact that you spend a huge portion of your hard-earned money on purchasing those energy sources.

(image credit: BobVila.com)
(image credit: BobVila.com)

But what if there is an alternative to the traditional sources of heating? What if you’re given the opportunity to heat your home as much as you need it and at the same time you spend less doing it? Well, the concept of hybrid heating offers that kind of benefit. The question though is if it really is practical?

By definition, hybrid heating is a process that combines the use of a fossil fuel combustion system intended to produce heat, including but not limited to gas, oil, and furnace, with an electric heat pump. The concept is assumed to be a lot more efficient and practical in a way that the technology used for a specific type of fuel will operate in the most efficient manner in various weather conditions. As a result, there will be a substantial reduction in both energy use and impact on the environment. But according to the proponents of this system, its most important benefit is the fact that it gives a whole new level of comfort inside a living space.

The way heat pumps work is that they will heat and cool the home in an efficient manner. Ask any energy expert and they will say the same thing – that heat pumps are the most economical way of heating in cold seasons. When the temperature outside is cold, there always is heat in the air and the heat pump will extract this heat in order to pump it inside the living space; but when the temperature outside reaches below zero or the standard balance point, the hybrid system will then switch to the standard, furnace type of heating using gas, oil, or propane.

The only downside to a hybrid heating system is the initial installation costs. Both the purchase of the equipment and the installation will cost more compared to traditional heating equipment and installation. This obviously is caused by the fact that two heating systems are integrated into one and two fuel sources are required.

(image credit: FowlerHeatingandCooling.com)
(image credit: FowlerHeatingandCooling.com)

Nonetheless, if you’re a homeowner who wants utmost comfort and warmth during the winter season, then you wouldn’t mind paying the extra just to have a hybrid system installed in your property. The real savings begin once you start using the system. In fact, those who have gone through lengths to try it will admit that they never would want to go back to the traditional and conventional method of heating with the use of a single equipment or system.